POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY

Maryland State

Put judges and officers for yourself in all your cities that your God is giving you, for your tribes, and they shall judge the people with righteousness. You shall not subvert justice; you shall not show favoritism…justice, justice shall you pursue…

– Deuteronomy 16:18-20

Law enforcement should serve and protect everyone, but Black and brown Marylanders are facing systemic violence and over-policing every day. Jewish tradition teaches us that destroying one life is akin to destroying the entire world. Police violence has destroyed so many worlds in our state, and Maryland laws prevent the public from even finding out about officers’ mistreatment of people. We must be able to hold police accountable to the people and communities they hurt.

The People: People hurt by police, particularly Black and Brown individuals, immigrants, LGBTQI+ people, and those experiencing mental health crises.

The Legislation: Under the Maryland Public Information Act (MPIA) disciplinary records of police may not be released, which prevents effective accountability and discipline for police officers.

  • Remove legal barriers that prevent public access to records of police misconduct.
  • Ensure public participation in holding police officers accountable for abuse and brutality.
  • Bill sponsors: Delegate Luke Clippinger (Baltimore City) and Senator Jill Carter (Baltimore City)

Key Partners: ACLU, NAACP Legal Defense Fund, CASA, Campaign for Justice Safety and Jobs (Baltimore), Silver Spring Justice Coalition (Montgomery County)Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle

“If a person… sits in his home and says to himself, ‘What have the affairs of society to do with me?… Why should I trouble myself with the people’s voices of protest? Let my soul dwell in peace!’ — if he does this, he destroys the world.” 

– Midrash Tanhuma, Mishpatim 2

Black and brown Marylanders are facing systemic violence and over-policing every day and our legislators must take immediate and meaningful action to change this. Jewish tradition teaches us that destroying one life is akin to destroying the entire world. Police violence has destroyed so many worlds in our state, and Maryland laws protect police, not residents. We must be able to hold police accountable to the people and communities they are sworn to protect and serve.

JUFJ has joined more than 80 other organizations from across Maryland to demand our state legislators commit to passing the following police reforms:

  1. Repeal the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights (LEOBR).
  2. Control of the Baltimore City Police Department must be restored to Baltimore City residents.
  3. Investigations into police misconduct must be transparent.
  4. Limit the use of force by law enforcement.
  5. Remove law enforcement from our children’s schools.

The full detailed statement on these demands that JUFJ is signed onto can be read here.

It is imperative that we have substantial police accountability in Maryland – it is long overdue. We need our legislators to commit to supporting these changes in order to root out racist, violent, and corrupt police practices.

Put judges and officers for yourself in all your cities that your God is giving you, for your tribes, and they shall judge the people with righteousness. You shall not subvert justice; you shall not show favoritism…justice, justice shall you pursue…

– Deuteronomy 16:18-20

Law enforcement should serve and protect everyone, but Black and brown Marylanders are facing systemic violence and over-policing every day. Jewish tradition teaches us that destroying one life is akin to destroying the entire world. Police violence has destroyed so many worlds in our state, and Maryland laws prevent the public from even finding out about officers’ mistreatment of people. We must be able to hold police accountable to the people and communities they hurt.

The People: People hurt by police, particularly Black and Brown individuals, immigrants, LGBTQI+ people, and those experiencing mental health crises.

The Legislation: Under the Maryland Public Information Act (MPIA) disciplinary records of police may not be released, which prevents effective accountability and discipline for police officers.

  • Remove legal barriers that prevent public access to records of police misconduct.
  • Ensure public participation in holding police officers accountable for abuse and brutality.
  • Bill sponsors: Delegate Luke Clippinger (Baltimore City) and Senator Jill Carter (Baltimore City)

Key Partners: ACLU, NAACP Legal Defense Fund, CASA, Campaign for Justice Safety and Jobs (Baltimore), Silver Spring Justice Coalition (Montgomery County)Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle

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